Monthly Archives: May 2016

CPR for Kids – What, When and Where?

Sarah Head Shot

Coming up next week Sarah Hunstead, Founder of CPR Kids will be joining Emma Walsh, founder of Parents@Work for our next Webinar: Keeping Your Children Safe this Winter.  To give you an idea of why the CPR team is so passionate we asked Sarah a few questions about what they do.

Who are CPR Kids and what do you do? 

CPR Kids empowers parents and carers of children with the lifesaving skills of prevention, recognition and response to illness and injury in children.  We are all paediatric nurses and midwives who have experienced everything we teach. Before founding CPR Kids, I was a Clinical Nurse Manager of a metropolitan Paediatric Emergency Department. I now have the privilege of leading a fantastic team of people striving to achieve our mission of empowering every parent and carer of kids with the ability to stay calm and act in an emergency involving their child.

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Value of a Working Parent: Why They Make Great Leaders and How They Do It

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It’s time to myth bust. There’s a rumour going around (and has been for an eternity) that once an employee becomes a parent they lose interest and motivation to advance their career. It’s commonly thought that working parents ‘have enough on their plate’ or ‘would not be able to commit the necessary time and energy to a more challenging leadership role’.

But what if these beliefs are out dated or, perhaps, were never true at all?

Consider for a moment the extensive experience gained and life lessons learnt whilst raising a family. The subject is vast but in a recent article from the Harvard Business Review Professor Jelena Zikic explores three main skills that are sharpened when one becomes a working parent:

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Parents At Work Advances the Wellbeing of Working Parents by Connecting Community Experts Through Virtual Events

Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 7.44.39 amParents At Work have partnered with a range of community, parenting and career service providers to introduce online learning to better support working parents and their leaders in their workplaces.

The learning partnerships provide Parents At Work with access to a broader network and community of like-minded organisations operating in a diverse range of fields such as community and family support, program management, disability, research, grand parenting, children’s services, counselling, youth work and research.

This will enable us to access and deliver a wider frame of resources and information – as well as the latest news and research – specific to managers and their working parent employees such as the National Families Week initiative, which celebrates the vital role that families play in Australian society.

Parents At Work continues to deliver a service of excellence to support businesses to assess and improve how effective their family friendly and flexible workplace policies and procedures are, essentially supporting them to stay ahead of the game in an area that is receiving increasing attention and legislative checks.

We want Australian employers to question whether what they are currently doing is really working. Why? More and more research is highlighting how beneficial it is for both business and workplace culture to enhance employee productivity and engagement. Just as vital is the reminder to appreciate all the ground breaking work our client organisations are doing to improve Australia’s working landscape. Our families and the community at large reap the seeds we sow. This is why our collaboration with providers that support Australian families is so important.

In celebration of National Families Week we are providing employers and HR/Diversity professionals with tangible ways to better support working parents:

  1. Sign up for one of our upcoming FREE special events featured in our latest newsletter. These special 1 hour virtual learning sessions are delivered via live webinars developed specifically to help working parents enhance their family wellbeing and manage work-life balance. Upcoming events include:
  • The Hidden Costs of Juggling Work and FamilyWhat Every CEO, HR and Diversity Professional must know and plan for
  • Cyber bullying and Social Media Pressures: How to support your kids online and off
  • Supporting Kids at School: What do they really need?
  1. How effective are your work and family policies? Do they position you as an Employer of Choice? Parents At Work offers a process and programs that will ensure your managers and employees have the tools and support to navigate the challenges of being working parents. Contact us to learn more.

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Being a working parent is harder than ever post Budget 2016

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How do employers and their working parent employees fair in Budget 2016? Was it fair and what is the real cost to the Australian economy?

The previously promised $3.2 billion reforms aimed at increasing the affordability of Childcare for Australia’s one million working families are no where to be found in the 2016 Budget.

Parents At Work Founder and Director Emma Walsh comments: “It’s disappointing that some the hardest working Australian’s – working parents – have, for the most part, been forgotten in this recent budget”.

The child care rebate has remained at $7,500 per child per year since 2008. The cost of child care has not remained the same since 2008. In fact it has grown almost 30% to an average $400 per week for a 50 hour week for long day care.*  This adds extra stress to many working parents and families, requiring them to work harder than ever to make ends meat. For some families this becomes too challenging and forces one parent to drop out of the paid workforce, contributing to a brain drain of female talent from the Australian labour market.

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