Category Archives: Resources for employers

Leading Career Development All the Way– Inside Deloitte’s Return to Work Program

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Last year Deloitte Australia launched the highly successful Returnship Program – a back to work employment program designed for candidates who have taken an extended break or leave from their career.  The program is back by popular demand with applications open until February for the 2018 intake.

A first of its kind in Australia, Deloitte’s program offers a learning and career development experience designed to support employees re-engage in the workforce.  The reason this programme is leading the way in the HR world is that it equips participants with the skills, confidence and support crew required to successfully hit the ground running as they reignite their career.

Parents At Work has partnered with Deloitte to design and deliver the individual coaching as part of the Returnship Program.

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How Australian Businesses Can Better Support Working Dads

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These days, working while raising children is increasingly common. According to the ABS Survey of Employment Arrangements, Retirement and Superannuation, 62% of coupled parents work, while 60% of single parents work. What’s more, 90% of dads with children under 15 are employed, meaning the vast majority of Australian fathers are juggling work and parenting commitments in tandem. Here are just some of the ways Australian businesses should be looking to create a supportive environment for working dads.

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Flexible working – what it takes to be successful (A case study)

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Productivity in the UK has come under the spotlight following news that the nation’s GDP per hour worked is lower now than it was pre-recession. In fact, the UK’s productivity is falling further behind that of its European neighbours.

To help tackle this trend, chancellor George Osborne published the report Fixing the Foundations: Creating a more prosperous nation, which sets the agenda for a national productivity drive.

Despite this, the real ‘game changer’ in the fight to recover the British economy will be the measures businesses themselves can take to enable their employees to be more productive.

Enabling employees to be more effective when they’re in and out of the office and offering them flexible working options are just some of steps that businesses have taken to help to increase productivity and growth over the last five to ten years. In addition, last year the government gave every employee the right to request flexible working from their employer. However, an overall uplift in UK productivity is yet to be realised and the adoption of flexible working is not widespread.

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Reducing re-entry anxiety: how employers can help new parents

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As a business owner, I understand the challenges that come along with keeping employees motivated and engaged at work. Here at Kids & Company we put a lot of effort into making our employees feel supported, appreciated and secure. This becomes especially important when employees go on maternity leave and are away for extended periods of time.
When the Canadian Government increased parental leave to 35 weeks a decade ago, it seemed great; but the reality is, 35 weeks away is a very long time – long enough to lose touch with colleagues and friends, to feel alienated and awkward when faced with changes like employee turnover.  According to Statistics Canada (2014), only 29 per cent of parents with children under 18 are currently employed, proving that returning to work isn’t as simple as falling back into routine.

Employee engagement is a daily challenge for those in HR. They understand that most employees want to maintain a connection with their workplace while on maternity leave, and know that they play a key role in keeping this connection alive.

Losing great employees is more than a HR issue. The average cost of replacing employees can be anywhere from 40 to 400 per cent of the annual salary for that position, making turnover a huge expense from a financial perspective, so it’s worthwhile to invest in easing the transition from home back to work, rather than lose resources.

But how do they do it?

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Supporting Working Parents – it’s time to act. Australia Human Rights Commission website to help employers and parents

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Spurred by shocking statistics last year that exposed 1 in 2 women and 1 in 4 men experience discrimination during pregnancy, parental leave and the return to work period [1] the Australian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has responded by launching a website for employers and employees to understand their legal obligations and entitlements better.

The new Government website – Supporting Working Parents – has been developed to help bridge the ‘gap between the law and education, and proper implementation’[2] of policies and practices that support employees with caring responsibilities.

The website includes “a compilation of leading practices and strategies being implemented in workplaces around the country to retain and support talented women and working parents,” said Elizabeth Broderick, Sex Discrimination Commissioner.

At the launch, employers were commended on their intention to ‘do the right thing’ but it was highlighted that many simply ‘don’t know what to do’ and ‘need guidance’.

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